November 13, 2011

Joseph Lyman Jessop’s wives (from left) Winnie, Beth, and Maleta do the dishes  together after supper. Though they all lived in the same two-story  house, each woman had her own kitchen and living room (this is Beth’s).  As for her own “mothers,” Dorothy Allred Solomon says, they got along well — but it  wasn’t always easy. “As with siblings, there’s always some rivalry, some  competition, maybe some jealousy,” the author tells LIFE.com. “But they  were not pleased about that…. I know that they would go and pray for  jealousy to depart rather than express it. They were very careful about  how they treated each other.”

photo by John Florea for Life magazine, 1944

Joseph Lyman Jessop’s wives (from left) Winnie, Beth, and Maleta do the dishes together after supper. Though they all lived in the same two-story house, each woman had her own kitchen and living room (this is Beth’s). As for her own “mothers,” Dorothy Allred Solomon says, they got along well — but it wasn’t always easy. “As with siblings, there’s always some rivalry, some competition, maybe some jealousy,” the author tells LIFE.com. “But they were not pleased about that…. I know that they would go and pray for jealousy to depart rather than express it. They were very careful about how they treated each other.”

photo by John Florea for Life magazine, 1944